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The Association of Smoking Status and Intensity of Smoking with Blood Lipid Spectrum in a Sample of Middle-Aged Men

https://doi.org/10.20996/1819-6446-2019-15-4-478-483

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Abstract

Material and methods. A 32-year prospective cohort follow-up of males from childhood (11-12 years) was carried out. After 32 years of 1005 participants 301 (30.0%) were examined. The survey included: a survey on a standard questionnaire (passport data, the presence of bad habits [smoking, alcohol consumption]), a three-time measurement of blood pressure. The levels of total cholesterol, high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides were determined.

Results. There is no established relationship between the average level of total cholesterol and hypercholesterolemia with smoking status and smoking intensity. It is shown that the level of triglycerides is statistically significantly higher in smokers as compared to non-smokers. Hypertriglyceridemia was not associated with smoking status, but was associated with the smoking index in current smokers, and only with the highest values of this index in past smokers. The probability of being in a group with dyslipidemia was more than 2 times higher in smokers as compared to non-smokers. The differences in the chances of getting into a group with dyslipidemia between smokers and nonsmokers in the past were statistically insignificant. The linear dependence of the frequency of dyslipidemia on the intensity of smoking at the present time, i.e. with increasing intensity of smoking increases the frequency of dyslipidemia. Such a dependence between smoking in the past and the frequency of dyslipidemia was not revealed. The probability of being in a group with a high atherogenic risk is 2 times higher in both smokers at present and smokers in the past as compared to non-smokers. The linear dependence of the frequency of high atherogenic risk on the intensity of smoking both now and in the past is established, i.e. with the increase in the intensity of smoking the frequency of high atherogenic risk increases in both smokers at present and smokers in the past as compared to non-smokers.

Conclusion. Close association of smoking with dyslipidemia was confirmed. The high probability of being in a group with a high atherogenic risk not only in smokers at present, but also smokers in the past indicates the importance of not only secondary, but also primary prevention of smoking.

About the Authors

A. A. Alexandrov
National Medical Research Center for Preventive Medicine
Russian Federation

Alexander A. Alexandrov – MD, PhD, Professor, Head of the Laboratory for the Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Children and Adolescents, Department of Primary Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in the Health System

Petroverigsky per. 10, Moscow, 101990 Russia



V. B. Rozanov
National Medical Research Center for Preventive Medicine
Russian Federation

Vyatcheslav B. Rozanov – MD, PhD, Leading Researcher, Laboratory for the Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Children and Adolescents, Department of Primary Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in the Health System

Petroverigsky per. 10, Moscow, 101990 Russia



M. B. Kotova
National Medical Research Center for Preventive Medicine
Russian Federation

Marina B. Kotova – PhD (Psychology), Leading Researcher, Laboratory for the Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Children and Adolescents, Department of Primary Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in the Health System

Petroverigsky per. 10, Moscow, 101990 Russia



V. A. Dadaeva
National Medical Research Center for Preventive Medicine
Russian Federation

Valida A. Dadaeva – MD, PhD, Researcher, Laboratory of the Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases of Children and Adolescents, Department of Primary Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in the Health System

Petroverigsky per. 10, Moscow, 101990 Russia



E. I. Ivanova
National Medical Research Center for Preventive Medicine
Russian Federation

Elena I. Ivanova – MD, Researcher, Laboratory for the Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in Children and Adolescents, Department of Primary Prevention of Chronic Non-Communicable Diseases in the Health System

Petroverigsky per. 10, Moscow, 101990 Russia



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For citation:


Alexandrov A.A., Rozanov V.B., Kotova M.B., Dadaeva V.A., Ivanova E.I. The Association of Smoking Status and Intensity of Smoking with Blood Lipid Spectrum in a Sample of Middle-Aged Men. Rational Pharmacotherapy in Cardiology. 2019;15(4):478-483. (In Russ.) https://doi.org/10.20996/1819-6446-2019-15-4-478-483

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ISSN 1819-6446 (Print)
ISSN 2225-3653 (Online)